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Twisting the law on the way to the battlefield

How the US stretches international and domestic laws to wage war on non-state Islamist forces, and how those forces invoke Islamic law to justify their own actions

On this episode of the Up Close podcast, we speak with international law expert Professor Naz Modirzadeh and political scientist Associate Professor Andrew March about how the United States and other governments contort and stretch international and domestic laws to accommodate the waging of war on non-state Islamist forces. We also explore how Islamist forces do their own twisting of Islamic law to justify their actions.

Presented by Lynne Haultain.

Full transcript and more information available here.

中国地区的听众可以通过此链接收听播客节目: http://upclose.unimelb.edu.au/episode/376-jihad-and-just-war-twisting-law-way-battlefield

Naz Modirzadeh is the founding Director of the Program on International Law and Armed Conflict and a Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School. She regularly advises and briefs international humanitarian organizations, UN agencies, and governments on issues related to international humanitarian law, human rights, and counter-terrorism regulations relating to humanitarian assistance. Her research focuses on intersections between the fields of international humanitarian law, international human rights law, and Islamic law. She is a Visiting Professorial Fellow with the Laureate Program in International Law for 2016.

Andrew March is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Yale University, and an Associate Professor (Adjunct) of Law at Yale Law School. His publications include Islam and Liberal Citizenship (Oxford University Press, 2009), and articles on religion, liberalism and Islamic law in, amongst others, American Political Science Review, Cardozo Law Review, Critical Inquiry, Philosophy & Public Affairs, Journal of Political Philosophy, and Islamic Law and Society. He is presently working on a book on the problem of sovereignty in modern Islamic thought, tentatively entitled The Caliphate of Man. He is a Visiting Professorial Fellow with the Laureate Program in International Law for 2016.

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