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Arts & Culture

  1. Podcast17 February 2021 - Eavesdrop on Experts

    The music of politics and protest

    University of Melbourne musicologist Dr Nick Tochka discusses the politics of music-making since 1945, particularly in Europe and the Americas.

  2. 4 February 2021 - Humanities

    Why we’re not doing better at racism in sport

    A University of Melbourne expert says Collingwood isn't the only AFL club where racism is part of the culture, but real change in Australian sport is possible.

  3. Podcast3 February 2021 - Humanities

    The stuff of death and the death of stuff

    University of Melbourne anthropologist Hannah Gould discusses her research into death, material culture, spirituality and the effects of COVID-19 on death care.

  4. 29 January 2021 - Music, Arts & Screen

    Queer I: Seeing queerly

    An NGV Triennial exhibition asks: What does it mean to see queerly? A University of Melbourne expert says it could mean to see oneself through a queer lens.

  5. 14 January 2021 - Music, Arts & Screen

    Reimagining waste

    The NGV Triennial explores how artists, designers, scientists and engineers are working to tackle our over-consumption, says a University of Melbourne expert.

  6. 4 January 2021 - Humanities

    Scientist and killer: A split life

    A Nazi on the margins of history emerges as urbane scientist who disturbingly went back to a successful career, University of Melbourne research finds.

  7. 22 December 2020 - Music, Arts & Screen

    Exploring the most unknown universe

    Exhibitions in the NGV Triennial explore how around 95 per cent of the universe is still a mystery awaiting discovery, says a University of Melbourne expert.

  8. 18 December 2020 - Humanities

    The Queen who defied the Holy Roman Emperor

    A University of Melbourne expert says Italian-born princess, Queen Bona, helps us understand how Renaissance women acquired, maintained and negotiated power.

  9. 16 December 2020 - Health & Wellbeing

    Vocal fry: What is it and why does it still polarise listeners?

    Whether you love, hate or are ambivalent about vocal fry, University of Melbourne linguists and voice experts can explain its origins and place in society