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Sciences & Technology

  1. 19 September 2019 - Science Matters

    Rediscovering a ‘lost’ species

    A rare insect species, Key’s Matchstick Grasshopper, was thought to be extinct in Victoria but has now been rediscovered by University of Melbourne researchers.

  2. 12 September 2019 - Science Matters

    Why are our rainforests burning?

    Many may think wet, humid rainforests are unburnable, but bushfires in Australia and the Amazon are proving otherwise, warns a University of Melbourne expert.

  3. 8 September 2019 - Legal Affairs

    The very human language of AI

    Artificial intelligence can be very human-like, even writing poetry; a University of Melbourne expert asks what ethical concerns this raises about the future.

  4. 27 August 2019 - Engineering & Technology

    Where’s the proof internet voting is secure?

    Victoria’s Electoral Matters Committee is looking into internet voting as a real option. But a University of Melbourne expert says there's no proof it's secure.

  5. 30 August 2019 - Science Matters

    The science that stops possums eating your garden

    When possums ate her garden, University of Melbourne's Professor Lynne Selwood fought back and invented a spray that protects plants from possum browsing.

  6. 28 August 2019 - Science Matters

    Heroines of mathematics

    We asked some of the University of Melbourne's prominent mathematicians to share with us who their favourite maths heroines are and why.

  7. 26 August 2019 - Engineering & Technology

    Engineering magnetics to grow human tissue

    Tissue engineering can restore damaged or lost tissue; University of Melbourne research is working to scale up the technology to regenerate human organs.

  8. 16 August 2019 - Health & Wellbeing

    The meaning in our stars

    Humans have long seen meaning in the stars, showing difference and similarities across cultures; University of Melbourne researchers are looking at how and why?

  9. 15 August 2019 - Engineering & Technology

    Two data points enough to spot you in open transport records

    University of Melbourne researchers have re-identified themselves and others in supposedly anonymous Myki datasets - highlighting a risk to privacy and safety.