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Animal Behaviour

  1. 5 April 2017 - Science Matters

    How staying close to mum pays off for kangaroos

    A 6 year study that observed eastern grey kangaroos in Victoria found that the more time young-at-foot kangaroos spend with their mothers, the more they thrive.

  2. 31 March 2017 - Go Figure

    Jaw-dropping: So how does a snake eat a man?

    A reticulated python reportedly ate a man in Indonesia, but just how can a snake eat a grown human?

  3. 21 October 2016 - Go Figure

    Why we show the whites of our eyes

    Of all the animals, only humans obviously show the whites of our eyes, making it easier for us to communicate and deceive with just glance.

  4. 23 September 2016 - Go Figure

    Why a cat’s whiskers are the bee’s knees

    Whether being used to aid navigation, warn of incoming predators or mop up milk, whiskers are an important addition to a cat's senses.

  5. 9 June 2016 - Science Matters

    What animals can tell us about sleeping

    To learn more about why we sleep, new research suggests we look to the animal world and how bees and birds (and others) do it in their natural environment.

  6. Podcast3 June 2016 - Up Close

    The necessity of kindness

    Evolutionary biologist Prof Lee Dugatkin on altruistic behaviour in insects, animals and beyond.

  7. 5 May 2016 - Science Matters

    Seven Super Mums of the animal kingdom

    From orang-utans to koalas, from octopuses to spiders, these mothers of the animal kingdom take mothering to the extreme.

  8. 28 April 2016 - Science Matters

    Farmed salmon hard of hearing

    Half of the world's farmed Atlantic salmon suffer from earbone deformities and associated hearing loss, according to new research.

  9. 28 April 2016 - Animals, Food & You

    Breaking: Pigs like cuddles too

    Pigs produce more oxytocin or 'love hormone' after positive interaction with a human, suggesting they feel emotions just like we do, a world-first study shows.

  10. 11 March 2016 - Go Figure

    Some newborns hit the ground running – and why others don’t

    Giraffes start running with the herd the same day they are born but humans can take a year or more just to start walking. The answer is economic.