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Evolution

  1. 14 May 2019 - Science Matters

    The superheroes of nutrient detection living in our oceans

    With no Uber Eats for bacteria, a University of Melbourne-led study reveals how ocean microorganisms are supremely evolved to detect and swim toward nutrients.

  2. 28 May 2018 - Science Matters

    Speeding natural selection in the name of conservation

    University of Melbourne scientists are using breeding to genetically adapt quolls to resist toxic cane toads – if it works it may help other endangered species

  3. 17 May 2018 - Health & Wellbeing

    The legacy of a great scientific hoax

    The University of Melbourne's anatomy museum features model fossils from the famous Piltdown Man hoax, which skewed the study of human evolution for decades.

  4. 14 March 2018 - Science Matters

    It’s not just antenna size, but scales that matter for lonely male moths

    University of Melbourne research finds some male moths have evolved intricate scale arrangements on their antennae to enhance detection of female sex pheromones

  5. 9 November 2017 - Science Matters

    Genes don’t always dictate that ‘boys will be boys’

    New University of Melbourne evolutionary biology research finds that genes don't always dictate that 'boys will be boys' in the animal world, just like humans.

  6. 26 May 2017 - Science Matters

    Darwin was right: Females prefer sex with good listeners

    University of Melbourne researchers prove one of Charles Darwin's theories about sexual selection; in moths - larger antennae can better detect female signals.

  7. Podcast17 May 2017 - Eavesdrop on Experts

    Forty per cent banana, ninety nine per cent bonobo

    Miegunyah Fellow at the University of Melbourne, Professor Bernard Wood, discusses our close cousins, the great apes, and ponders who our ancestors really are.

  8. 16 March 2017 - Science Matters

    Lizards keep it local when it comes to colour change

    Bearded dragons are better at adapting to colours in their local environment than unfamiliar colours, but they will still have a go at finding a new one.

  9. 23 December 2016 - Go Figure

    Goosebumps can give us more than the shivers

    Goosebumps are not just your body's way of reacting to emotion. They could hold the key to stopping skin cancer, treating burns and even curing baldness.

  10. Podcast3 June 2016 - Up Close

    The necessity of kindness

    Evolutionary biologist Professor Lee Dugatkin talks to the University of Melbourne's Up Close podcast about altruistic behaviour in insects, animals and beyond.